Tool Museum


19th century Corer

19th century Corer

This could be as much as 120 years old.

It’s a tinware corer. simple and effective.

thin steel, coated with tin to keep it from rusting.

there is no maker’s name/mark most likely made in the USA.

look at that great style!

Look at that style!

This is a great aluminum egg beater Pat’d April 20, 1920.

It is marked “Aluminum Beauty” “Ullman Aluminum Division Inc. Long Island City, N.Y. U.S.A.”

Everyone seems to have the ubiquitous cran from a can on the Thanksgiving table. I just doesn’t fit in with the other silver and fine china unless you have one of these…

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Yup.

Yup

Wow.

Wow.

Amazing.

Amazing.

These servers are Fire King, and were probably made sometime in the 60s. They both have oven safe glass inserts so you can bake ahead of time, light the candle in the bottom and then party through the night.

UPDATE: These have been snatched up. One lucky customer took them both home, Happy Thanksgiving!

Landers, Frary  & Clark New Britain, CT ca. 1905

Landers, Frary & Clark New Britain, CT ca. 1905

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Slice-a-way Shredder & Slicer

Slice-a-way Shredder & Slicer

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yup. It’s a meat juice press.

Columbia #2 Meat Juice Press Made by Landers, Frary & Clark New Britain Conn, USA

Columbia #2 Meat Juice Press Made by Landers, Frary & Clark New Britain Conn, USA

It is made of cast iron and the inside of the press part is tinned.

I was able to find reference in a 19th century medical book about the use of a meat juice press to extract the juice from a 2 ounce piece of beef.

“The liquid obtained contains all the nourishing qualities of the flesh, and none of the indigestible structure, and it is much more palatable than ordinary soup or beef tea, and is decidedly more nutritious.” -1887

I guess if your teeth were bad and there were no vitamixes you’d have to get your meat somehow.

I’ll have to give it a try and see what I can manage to get out of a piece of meat.

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